Tuesday, August 11, 2020

Today's Links

 1--Seattle Concil cuts SPD budget

 

The Seattle City Council on Monday passed its amended 2020 budget that included historic reductions to the Seattle Police Department, such as cutting as many as 100 officers through layoffs and attrition.

“Today, council colleagues, we are beginning to put ourselves on the path to righting those historic wrongs,” Council member Teresa Mosqueda said.

The action was supported by demonstrators who have marched in the city following the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis but was strongly opposed by Mayor Jenny Durkan and police Chief Carmen Best. But it's far less than the 50% the council initially promised, which Black Lives Matter supporters demanded be reinvested elsewhere in the community.

the approved budget will cut about $3 million of the department's $400 million annual budget this year....Best said the layoffs would result in the newest and most diverse officers being let go. The council suggested those layoffs could happen “out of order” and target officers with the most complaints. But Best said it would be extremely difficult and even illegal.

 

2--Sweden--Just one death in August

 

In August, Sweden has registered just one death (!) with/from the coronavirus. Yes, you read that correctly. One death so far. 

For the month of July, Sweden reported 226 deaths. They’ve accounted for 805 June deaths, 1646 in May, and 2572 in April. The deaths attributed to COVID-19 went from about a 50% reduction to falling off of a cliff.

The story is the same in the hospitals. COVID-19 is hardly registering as a blip on the radar. Sweden has reported just 4 new COVID-19 patients in their ICUs in August. The month of July saw only 52 COVID-19 patients in ICUs...

 

global public health expert class threw the pandemic playbook out the window, disregarding hundreds of years of proven science on herd immunity, in order to attempt to assert human control over a submicroscopic infectious particle. It hasn’t worked, to say the least. There is no evidence anywhere in the world that lockdowns or masks have *stopped* the spread of the virus. Sweden was one of the few places where cooler heads prevailed, and the scientists realized that attempts to stop the virus would be worse than the disease itself, in the form of economic and social ruin.

 

3--The Real World Reasserts Itself

 

D.C.’s numbers, however, pale by comparison to Chicago, where this weekend recorded 32 more people shot, with three dead.

According to the Sun-Times, there were 106 homicides in the city in July, a single-month body count almost equal to the toll D.C. has piled up in all of the first seven months of 2020.

A disproportionate number of the dead and wounded are Black Americans, and a disproportionate number of the shooters and killers are Black men.

If black lives matter, where is Black Lives Matter?

Rarely in these stories of shootings and killings does one read that the dead were the victims of rogue cops or white supremacists.

Indeed, the front page of Monday’s New York Times gave voice to the city’s Black and Hispanic leaders who are objecting to a proposed $1 billion cut in the police budget. The people in high-crime precincts, for whom these leaders speak, want more, not fewer, cops on the beat.

 

Today, people watch their leaders in city after city fail to keep the peace and restore order as protesters riot at will, and they make plans to move out. In the suburbs and country, they quietly observe the inability of cops to quell the violence, and they buy guns.

While the right backs Trump’s stand for law and order, the ultimate battle here may be between liberal Democrats elected to, and failing to, run the cities, and the radical left and Marxists who welcome their failure as they intend to kick the liberals down the stairs.

 

4--In Minneapolis 80% of the black population oppose disbanding the police, PCR

 

“Almost overnight the brakes went on in downtown,” Cramer said. “The point where it all started to change was the day the City Council announced it supported defunding the police department.” Cramer said in a six-week period from that day there were 45 companies that indicated they were either moving out of downtown or were a business that was no longer moving downtown, and there were 13 companies in that group with 100 or more employees and one with 600.

Levin Lewis, executive director of the Minneapolis Business Owners and Managers Association, told KSTP that some high-end development deals have stalled because of public safety worries, and it could amount to hundreds of millions of dollars

 

In Minneapolis 80% of the black population oppose disbanding the police. Black businesses suffered along with others from looting and burning. The “George Floyd protests” was not a black event. It was a white event organized and paid for by whites. This is so true that it is now satire — https://babylonbee.com/news/riotous-blm-protest-suddenly-realizes-they-dont-have-any-black-people  

 

5--Pelosi Relief Bill will end freedom in America

 

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has proposed the next multi-trillion dollar “coronavirus relief” spending bill that will support testing, tracing, treatment, isolation, and mask policies that have been part of a “national strategic plan” she has been advocating. The Trump administration is not opposing Pelosi’s plan on principle. Instead, it is haggling over the price.

But, even if the strategic plan could be implemented at little or no monetary cost, it would still impose an unacceptable cost in lost liberty.

Pelosi’s plan will lead to either a federal mask mandate or federal funding of state and local mask mandate enforcement. Those who resist wearing masks could likely be reported to the authorities by government-funded mask monitors. We can label this the “Stasi” approach to health policy, after the infamous East German secret police force.

Contact tracing could lead to forcing individuals to download a tracing app. The app would record where an individual goes and alert authorities that an individual has been near someone who has tested positive for coronavirus.

The strategic plan could eventually include Bill Gates’ and Anthony Fauci’s suggestion that individuals receive “digital certificates” indicating they are vaccinated for or immune to coronavirus. A certificate would be required before an individual can go to work, to school, or even to the grocery store. The need to demonstrate vaccination for or immunity to coronavirus in order to resume normal life would cause many people to “voluntarily” receive a potentially dangerous coronavirus vaccine.

 

 

The coronavirus panic has given new life to the push for a unique patient identifier. The unique patient identifier was authorized in 1996, but appropriations bills since 1998 have contained a provision forbidding the federal government from developing and implementing the identifier. Unfortunately, two weeks ago, the House of Representatives voted to repeal the ban. The unique patient identifier would aid government efforts to track and vaccinate every American, as well as to infringe in other ways on liberty in the name of “health.” 

 

6--The Coronavirus is a Trojan horse, the vehicle for introducing a new totalitarian society

 

As is glaringly obvious to anyone whose mind has not been taken over yet, the “apocalyptic coronavirus pandemic” was always just a Trojan horse, a means of introducing the “New Normal,” which they’ve been doing since the very beginning.

 

the idea that the fundamental structure of society needs to be drastically and irrevocably altered on account of a virus that poses no threat to the vast majority of the human species.

And, make no mistake, that is exactly what the “New Normal” movement intends to do. “New Normalism” is a classic totalitarian movement (albeit with a pathological twist), and it is the goal of every totalitarian movement to radically, utterly transform society, to remake the world in its monstrous image.

That is what totalitarianism is, this desire to establish complete control over everything and everyone, every thought, emotion, and human interaction. The character of its ideology changes (i.e., Nazism, Stalinism, Maoism, etc.), but this desire for complete control over people, over society, and ultimately life itself, is the essence of totalitarianism … and what has taken over the minds of the New Normals.

In the New Normal society they want to establish, as in every totalitarian society, fear and conformity will be pervasive.

 

7-- Parents should listen to Trump, not the teachers’ union boss


University College London’s systematic review and meta-analysis of more than 6,300 studies found children and young people appear to be 56 per cent less likely to catch Covid-19 than adults, supporting the view that they are likely to play a smaller role in transmitting the virus. Lead author Professor Russell Viner noted: ‘It is well known that children and young people make up only a very small percent of confirmed clinical cases of Covid-19 in most countries, including the UK. Children and teenagers make up an even smaller proportion of severe cases or deaths.’

Every science site you turn to agrees that worldwide, relatively few children have been reported with Covid-19. Data from the Netherlands confirms the current understanding that children play a minor role in its spread.

When they have contracted the illness, a significant proportion have been shown to have pre-existing medical conditions, but even then death is rare. 

When they have contracted the illness, a significant proportion have been shown to have pre-existing medical conditions, but even then death is rare. 

In the UK, by June 23 five under-18s had died of Covid-19.

Similarly, in the USA only 0.2 per cent of Covid fatalities have been under 17. 

The American Academy of Paediatrics confirms that hospitalisation and death associated with Covid-19 is uncommon in children. 

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC),   only 2 per cent of US domestic Covid-19 cases have occurred in children under 18. Twenty children under five in the US have died, out of some 23million children aged up to five. Yet CNN insists that dozens of children have died.

Meanwhile a report from the USA has recently revealed that three times more children up to 14 have died of influenza than of Covid-19 (101 to 31) since the beginning of the year. 

(For a further analysis of the relative risk of Covid for children, see this edition of Lockdown Sceptics).

Then we have the warning of Robert Redfield, CDC director, that additional deaths from suicides and drug overdoses by adolescents have been ‘far greater’ than Covid deaths in recent months, a view of the appalling collateral damage – backed up by the Telegraph’s science editor last week – that Dr Bousted appears to have little concern for. 

Finally, a German study I found has come to the conclusion that children actually act epidemiologically like ‘brake blocks’ and slow down the spread of the virus. 

With medical evidence for the need to close schools still so thin on the ground, epidemiologist Mark Woolhouse, a member of the government’s Sage committee, has now admitted that it may have been a mistake to close schools in March. He said that there is not a single confirmed case worldwide of infection of a teacher by a pupil. 

The simple fact is that worldwide, relatively few children have been reported with Covid-19, Children and COVID-19 and even fewer have died. And this of course is what President Trump knows. Whatever else parents think of him, on this it’s he who should be given the benefit of the doubt, not Facebook and Twitter or the subversive Dr Bousted.

 

 8--America's cities reverting to past--Broke, dirty and dangerous --Tucker: Dead bodies don't count unless they are politically useful

 

 

 

 

Monday, August 10, 2020

Today's Links


White NYT reporter tells millions of black voters that they didn't vote for Saint Hillary because Russia fooled them into staying home. Note not just the racism here, but the projection: blaming Russia for suppressing the black vote is a straight-up disinformation campaign. twitter.com/nicoleperlroth

 Aaron Mate


comments line-- this is totally on the democrats. Their cities, their voting bloc’s spawn. Tax base is being trashed and looted. pretty soon you run out of plate glass, then plywood and the stores will be abandoned. Insurance rates will make it unprofitable to stock your shelves. Tourist and convention dollars are disappearing, property owners are almost maxed out and then where do they go to fund their budget....

 

 

 1-- Defunding plan moves forward in Seattle

 

“Instead of buying bullets, violence and intimidation, we are choosing — the city council is choosing — to invest in peace and restoration in a community that has been ravaged by generations of racism,” Council President Gonzales said as she explained the vision for future policing in Seattle....

Last month, seven of nine councilmembers pledged support for defunding SPD by 50% in 2020 and reinvesting that money into communities of color as demanded by King County Equity Now and Decriminalize Seattle, which encompass dozens of community groups, non-profits, and other BIPOC-focused organizations. However, the council recently admitted it would not be able to hit that 50% mark – about $85 million — for 2020, and instead would pass what it could for the 2020 package and focus on getting to that 50% in the 2021 budget, which the council starts work on next month.

The highlights of the 2020 package expected to get final approval Monday include:

  • Eliminating up to 100 sworn officer positions via layoffs and attrition
  • Capping command staff pay, including the police chief, at $150,000
  • Ending the Navigation Team (14 of the 100 officers mentioned above)

The package also cuts or reduces a variety of SPD’s specialized units, including the Harbor Patrol Unit, S.W.A.T. team, Public Affairs units, and School Resource Officers, and cuts $800,000 of SPD’s retention and recruitment.

The move to defund (and eliminate) the Navigation Team, and redirect the money to homeless outreach services such as REACH will “dramatically restrict the city’s ability to address unauthorized encampments,” warned Jason Johnson, Interim Director of Seattle’s Human Services Department in a letter to the council last week.

 

2--Weatherman Cliff Mass cancelle


3--Mostly peaceful??" Chaos In Chicago: Bridges Raised To Prevent Gun-Toting Looters Getting Downtown

 

4--Videos of Chicago looting  


5--Biden's racial gaffes


And yet the New York Times itself had a feature story in 2016 on legitimate reasons that some black voters in Wisconsin declined to vote for Clinton. Trump won the state by just 27,000 votes, and voter turnout was at a 16-year low. In just one black Milwaukee neighborhood, turnout dropped 20 percent from 2012's level. Some of the black men interviewed by the Times cited past failures by Democrat politicians to improve their lives, while others express distrust for Clinton. Another cited 1994 criminal-justice legislation that was championed by Clinton and signed into law by her husband, President Bill Clinton, leading to unfair sentencing guidelines that put more blacks in prison.   

To be sure, Hillary Clinton earned some distrust with black voters when she said of the 1994 bill that a crackdown on youth gangs was needed to deal with "superpredators" and "bring them to heel." She also supported welfare reforms that, along with the crime bill, "decimated black America," author and civil rights advocate Michelle Alexander wrote in 2016.

Biden is likely looking to bolster his support among black voters after two gaffes last week at an event hosted by black and Latino journalists. "Unlike the African American community, with notable exceptions, the Latino community is an incredibly diverse community with incredibly diverse attitudes about different things," Biden said Wednesday. That came on the heels of being asked by a black reporter if he had taken a test of his cognitive abilities. Biden replied"That's like saying to you, before you got on this program, if you had taken a test were you taking cocaine or not. What do you think, huh? Are you a junkie?"


"Unlike the African American community, with notable exceptions, the Latino community is an incredibly diverse community with incredibly diverse attitudes about different things," Biden said, later apologizing and claiming that's not what he meant to say. Yet back in a May interview with a black radio host, he notoriously said: “If you have a problem figuring out whether you're for me or Trump, then you aint black.”

Michael Brown was killed because he was engaged in felony assault of a police officer, according to Obama’s own DOJ investigation, and Democrats’ continued pretense that Brown was a martyr is dishonest and disgraceful
@JoeBiden
It's been six years since Michael Brown's life was taken in Ferguson — reigniting a movement. We must continue the work of tackling systemic racism and reforming policing.

 

6--Police stop RT interview with asylum seeker as we investigate the controversy of migrants living in hotels all around the UK 

 

Hundreds of illegal migrants arriving daily on small boats and dinghies are being housed in 3- and 4-star hotels across the country, causing consternation among local residents. Why are officials being so silent over this?

As a journalist in Britain, you don’t expect to be shut down by the police. But that’s precisely what happened during RT's visit to the 3-star Bell Hotel in Epping, about 17 miles north of London. No blame can be attributed to the officers, who were only responding to a call from the hotel’s management.

The question is, why were they even alerted?

The reason for that is unclear, but it’s just one of a number of unanswered questions about the controversy surrounding hundreds of asylum seekers being housed in hotels up and down the country, some operated by well-known chains like Hilton, Holiday Inn and Radisson

 

Social media has been ablaze with a list of around 20 establishments being circulated by activists, highlighting where the asylum seekers are staying.

Some people are privately concerned that rogue elements may begin to turn up at these hotels to confront the migrants, which in the worst circumstances could possibly spark violence.

Nigel Farage, the Brexit Party leader, posted a video of him visiting a Hilton hotel in Bromsgrove, Worcestershire but despite a big reaction, the mainstream media has generally avoided the matter.

On our visit to The Bell Hotel, we were unsure what to expect.

Some hotels reportedly have security guards, but when we arrived, there was no answer at the entrance and the front door was locked. However, many of the rooms are in small buildings surrounding the reception, so we walked over and spoke to three asylum seekers

 

The government’s position? Silence

But despite no one appearing to be unhappy, the interview was cut short as the police arrived – in total, four officers in two cars, one of which was unmarked.

They informed us the management has said we were trespassing on private property and the officers politely escorted us off the premises - and also informed us where we could continue filming.

We subsequently interviewed three concerned local residents who voiced frustrations about the lack of communication from the authorities about the housing of asylum seekers.

The entire process is shrouded in mystery and misinformation.

The issue has also become more prominent due to the flood of asylum seekers arriving in Britain, mainly by small boats or dinghies from France (some apparently escorted across by French Naval ships), along the Kent coast, mainly into the port of Dover. Thursday alone saw 235 people – including a heavily pregnant woman – cross from France, the highest amount ever in a single day.

‘If you complain, you’re called a Nazi’

In all of this, there’s a large group of local residents who feel they no longer have a voice. RT spoke to several of them, but most were unwilling to go on the record, for fear of losing their employment or being targeted.

One woman, whose husband served in the British Army’s Royal Engineers regiment, told me:

“There's a silent majority in this country who are seething. As soon as you call out mass immigration and kick up about it, you’re called a racist or a Nazi but we aren't - it’s a way of shutting us down.

“No one has a problem with genuine refugees who are running away from raping, pillaging and ISIS, but what we have got a problem with is, our people being on a waiting list for social housing, and these refugees going straight into fully-furnished homes. It's all being done without people’s consent.

“And if you say anything on social media, the police investigate you for a hate crime and it makes you absolutely sick.

“I know a guy who told me he said something on Twitter and the next thing, it was in the local paper and the police were investigating him. He was scared to lose his job and then not be able to afford his mortgage.

"Ordinary people are being persecuted. We feel we don’t have a voice, but we pay our taxes and it's out of control. I don’t blame those people, I blame our government for not stopping it. Why aren't they sending these people back? We feel let down and like we’ve been slapped in the face by our own country.”

 

7--The World Economic Forum and all others pushing a new, hi-tech version of apartheid need to be told in no uncertain terms where to get off. For the world they are trying to create really is too awful to contemplate.

 

The WEF presents the ‘Great Reset’ as a positive: in fact, if implemented, it will usher in a new, dark age of soul-destroying totalitarian tyranny. Important freedoms that we all took for granted will be lost. Spontaneity will be removed from our lives. The great irony is that George Orwell’s 1984 never arrived in 1984, but in 2020, under the cover of authorities ‘concern’ over an upper-respiratory tract virus. Covid-19 could perhaps more accurately be called ’Covid-1984’ for all the restrictive, authoritarian measures it has ushered in.

It’s fairly obvious now that in the countries most tightly hitched to the globalists’ agenda,  the sterile anti-human ‘New Normal’ of social distancing, mandatory mask wearing and the use of biometric Health/Covid passes is meant to be permanent. Last week we heard that the English Premier League was looking at ‘clinical passports‘ as a way of getting fans back into stadiums.

 

8--If COVID Fatalities Were 90.2% Lower, How Would You Feel About Schools Reopening?

By H. Ealy, M. McEvoy, M. Sava, S. Gupta, D. Chong, D. White, J. Nowicki, P. Anderson

 

  • According to the CDC, 101 children age 0 to 14 have died from influenza, while 31 children have died from COVID-19.
  • No evidence exists to support the theory that children pose a threat to educational professionals in a school or classroom setting, but there is a great deal of evidence to support the safety of in-person education.
  • According to the CDC, 131,332 Americans have died from pneumonia and 121,374 from COVID-19 as of July 11th, 2020.
  • Had the CDC used its industry standard, Medical Examiners’ and Coroners’ Handbook on Death Registration and Fetal Death Reporting Revision 2003, as it has for all other causes of death for the last 17 years, the COVID-19 fatality count would be approximately 90.2% lower than it currently is.

9--War Dept rumor control 

 

10--Gobal Lockdowns Will Plunge 100 Million into Extreme Poverty

 

Today sees the publication of a disturbing report by the Associated Press’s Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. It purports to be an investigation into the devastating impact of “the virus” on the developing world, but, of course, what it’s really talking about is “the lockdowns”. Here’s an extract:

With the virus and its restrictions, up to 100 million more people globally could fall into the bitter existence of living on just $1.90 a day, according to the World Bank. That’s “well below any reasonable conception of a life with dignity,” the United Nations special rapporteur on extreme poverty wrote this year. And it comes on top of the 736 million people already there, half of them in just five countries: Ethiopia, India, Nigeria, Congo and Bangladesh.

India is struggling with one of the world’s largest virus caseloads and the effects of a lockdown so abrupt and punishing that Prime Minister Narendra Modi asked the poor to forgive him. Nigeria, Africa’s most populous nation, has surpassed India with the most people in extreme poverty — roughly half its citizens. And Congo remains one of the world’s most crisis-ridden countries, with outbreaks of Ebola and measles smoldering.

Even China, Indonesia and South Africa are expected to have more than 1 million people each fall into extreme poverty, the World Bank says.

“It’s a huge, huge setback for the entire world,” Gayle Smith, president of the ONE Campaign to end extreme poverty, told The Associated Press. Smith, a former administrator for the U.S. Agency for International Development, called the global response to the crisis “stunningly meager.”

Most of the millions newly at risk are in sub-Saharan Africa, a region that against countless odds had some of the world’s fastest growing economies in recent years.

It’s a timely reminder that the the main cost of the lockdowns favoured by liberal policy-makers across the world will not be people in the West, but those hovering just above the poverty line in the developing world. Thanks to the misguided enthusiasm of Western governments for imprisoning entire populations in their homes, thereby triggering a global recession, tens of millions of people will die of starvation in low-income countries. Worth reading in full.

 

11--The Myth That Lockdowns Stop Pandemics

 

12--‘Politicized’ Hydroxychloroquine Being ‘Discarded Prematurely’ Warns Oxford Professor

 

13--Freddie Sayers-- What we can learn from the Swedish paradox

There's nothing libertarian about this country. So why the laissez-faire response to Covid-19?

 

14--Lockdown supporters cannot bear the thought that Sweden has got it right

An honest appraisal of how the Scandinavian country has fared raises plenty of awkward questions for politicians in the rest of Europe 

 

Sweden has fulfilled the same role during the Covid-19 crisis as Argentina fulfils in every World Cup. It’s the team which everyone – apart from the natives themselves, naturally – wants to get beaten. This has been especially true in the liberal US press, which has taken time off from berating Donald Trump to publish lengthy pieces on the supposed failure of the Swedish approach. “The Swedish government didn’t enforce social distancing,” began the Washington Monthly, for example, in May when Sweden briefly had the world’s highest death rate

 

15--Barr--The left will stop at nothing

 

“They are a revolutionary group that is interested in some form of socialism, communism. They are essentially bolsheviks. 

“They were trying to impeach him from day one. They have done everything they can. They have shredded the norms of our system to do what they can to drive him from office or to debilitate his administration, and I think that’s because of the desire for power,” Barr said.

“The left wants power because that is essentially their state of grace in their secular religion. They want to run people’s lives so they can design utopia for all of us. That’s what turns them on—it’s the lust for power.

“They weren’t expecting Trump’s victory and it outrages them,” he added.

 

16--‘Pupils pose little risk of spreading Covid’ 

A study suggests there is little evidence the virus is transmitted at school, according to a scientist who backs reopening

One of the largest studies in the world on coronavirus in schools, carried out in 100 institutions in the UK, will confirm that “there is very little evidence that the virus is transmitted” there, according to a leading scientist.

Professor Russell Viner, president of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and a member of the government advisory group Sage, said: “A new study that has been done in UK schools confirms there is very little evidence that the virus is transmitted in schools.

 

“This is the some of the largest data you will find on schools anywhere. Britain has done very well in terms of thinking of collecting data in schools.”

 

 

 

 

Sunday, August 9, 2020

Today's Links

 1--For the West to Survive--Pursue the Athenian Creed over the the Tyranny of Correctness

 

2--Huawei, Tik-Tok and WeChat

 

Huawei

Trump’s problems with Huawei are twofold. The most obvious is that China is eating America’s lunch when it comes to innovation and invention and Trump would like to slow this down by destroying Huawei and is clearly making every possible effort in this regard, including bullying and threatening half the known world against using Huawei’s products. But this is the small part of the problem; the real issue is espionage. There is no practical value in disputing the assertion that Cisco and other American hardware and software firms install back doors to all their equipment for the convenience of CIA and NSA access. But suddenly Huawei is replacing Cisco and those other American firms with its better and less expensive equipment...

 

Tik-Tok

Tik-Tok is nothing of consequence, except that it is in direct competition with similar American platforms and has proven too popular and too competitive to be permitted to survive. This is just a cheap, below-the-belt and illegal-as-hell shot at China. No threat, no nothing. However, as with all similar IT products and platforms it contains much personal information especially useful for marketing, which has so far been the private property of people like Google, Facebook and Twitter. Thus, Trump kills two birds with one stone: either simply kill Tik-Tok on some trumped-up accusation (if you’ll excuse the expression) of espionage, or force a sale to an American company. Either way, China loses massively while the political oppression and marketing value of that personal information remains safely in trusted American hands.

 

WeChat

 

The point with Trump’s “sanction” of WeChat is first that it will terminally disrupt international communications between China and the US for students, scientists, diplomats, media reporters, for all those in the US who have frequent communications with China, effects felt more seriously by those in China, which is a plus for Trump. Second, Trump’s administration is uncomfortable with the extent to which WeChat is encroaching on the American turf of Twitter, Facebook, WhatsApp, Instagram and more, with already around 100 million downloads in the US, and his actions are partially to reclaim that turf by simply banning a competing medium that is threatening to take over and seriously downgrade the popularity of similar American platforms.

 

3--An Active-Duty Officer Analyzes the Latest George Floyd Video

 

Body cams have given the public an intimate look at police work. Many people now think they are experts in police tactics, and love to play “Monday morning quarterbacks.” Except, it’s not a game. It’s a matter of life and death and is “played” in fractions of seconds. Also, no video can give a 100 percent accurate depiction of what happened. Even after 25 years on the street, I watch footage cautiously. If I wasn’t there, I can’t fully understand the situation. There’s always more to the story, and there’s certainly more to the George Floyd story. I have taken a careful look at the recently leaked, approximately 20-minute video of the arrest that you can watch here. But, as we will see, there is perhaps an even more important piece of evidence hiding in plain site in Floyd’s official autopsy report. It strongly suggests that Floyd was an overdose death just waiting to happen.

 

4--Sweden

 

Certainly every citizen I met on the streets seemed to support the strategy. ‘If we look back in a couple of years I think we will be seen to have handled the situation well,’ said Hans Isoz, an investor in digital companies

On one key measure – percentage change in new confirmed cases over the past fortnight relative to the previous 14 days – Sweden is down more than a third. 

This contrasts with sharp rises in neighbouring Denmark, Finland and Norway, along with countries such as Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK.

Meanwhile, the latest data suggests Sweden is suffering less severe economic trauma than most major European nations, while it has, almost uniquely among Western countries, kept schools open. ..


A fifth of residents have antibodies, while a larger proportion may be protected through the response of T-cells, which ‘remember’ infections and kill pathogens that reappear. 

‘It is not yet herd immunity but immunity levels have so far been growing steadily,’ said Prof Ekstrom. (Although even Tegnell admitted to me that he was left confused by the ‘mystery of immunity’ with this disease).

Perhaps the most popular part of Sweden’s strategy has been the decision to keep most schools open. One joint study with public health authorities in Finland, where almost all pupils were kept out of school for two months, found their differing approaches made no measurable difference to contagion rates. 

‘This has strong benefits for parents of small children while avoiding disruption to children’s learning and preventing long-term scarring for the labour market,’ said Karolina Ekholm, former deputy governor of Sweden’s central bank.

 

We spoke after the release of data showing that Sweden’s economy, which grew marginally in the first quarter of this year, shrunk more than at any point since the Second World War during the pandemic’s three-month peak. 

Yet it outperformed most key rivals. It fell 8.6 per cent over the second quarter compared with a 12 per cent fall across the Eurozone. Analysts fear the UK economy may shrink 20 per cent over this period.

‘It’s grim by any normal standards but compared with other parts of Europe they have done well,’ said David Oxley, senior Europe analyst at Capital Economics. Sweden’s big exporters are seeing profits decline smaller than anticipated while there are fewer bankruptcies than feared.

‘If a business can stay open, it’s clearly better than closing,’ said Esbjorn Lundevall, an analyst at Scandinavian bank SEB.

 

 5--'It's okay when it comes out of Chuck Schumer's mouth?' Democrat senator says schools must reopen or economy suffers 

 

6--How to Be More Afraid!

 

7--Covid wards empty as virus death toll plunges

Fatalities are down 99% and some hospitals have no coronavirus patients, sparking hope that ‘herd immunity’ may be near

The number of people in hospital with Covid-19 has fallen 96% since the peak of the pandemic, official data reveals.

Hospital staff are now treating just 700 coronavirus patients a day in England, compared to about 17,000 a day during the middle of April, according to NHS England.

 

8--‘White privilege’: an elite ideology

Identity politics destroys class solidarity, and that suits the powerful just fine.

Regrettably, modern anti-racism has become the means through which class hatred is peddled and inflamed. Indeed, research suggests that ‘white privilege lessons’ have no impact on social liberals’ sympathy towards black people, but they do decrease their sympathy for poor whites, leaving them more likely to think they have ‘failed to take advantage of their racial privilege’.

 

Left-wing identity politics claims to sit in the anti-racist tradition. But today it plays much the same role that the racist right did in the past. It works to fracture class solidarity by insisting that different sections of the working class are fundamentally antagonistic to one another’s interests.

No wonder the elites love this ‘white privilege’ guff so much. A divided working class is no threat to them

 

What some right-wingers are cottoning on to, and exploiting to varying degrees of electoral success (Bailey, bless him, doesn’t stand a chance), is that the left’s recent embrace of wokeness is fundamentally a betrayal of class politics, and that where class politics can unite, wittering on about privilege only divides.

On a practical level, identity politics is just bad politics. Telling working-class white people, a huge chunk of the electorate, that even if they’re struggling to pay the bills and are thousands of pounds in debt they should always remember it could be worse is at best a non-starter. Making statements like ‘you can be homeless and still have white privilege’ would be churlish, to put it lightly, even if they were true

But the problem with the theory of white privilege is not just that it winds people up. It also fundamentally fails to explain inequalities in society. In the UK, as Christopher Snowdon explained recently, white working-class boys are the poorest performing group in terms of educational attainment. Unless we are expected to believe this is solely down to them squandering their relative privilege, clearly race isn’t everything.

This is not to say racism doesn’t exist, or that racial inequalities aren’t real and serious. But the picture is far more complicated than the narrative of ‘white supremacy’ would have us believe: British workers of Chinese and Indian heritage are the two highest-earning ethnic groups by hourly pay, for instance, and there are big gaps in educational attainment between British African and British Caribbean kids.

For all the disparities in outcomes between different groups, influenced by various cultural, historical and economic factors, what class you were born into remains far more consequential than your skin colour. Even in eras far more racist and discriminatory than our own, radicals recognised that overcoming class domination went hand in hand with overcoming racism – not least given many ethnic minorities were and are disproportionately working class.

Simplistic notions like white privilege, then, obfuscate issues of economic privilege and dim the prospects of forging the coalitions necessary to make life better for all working people. What’s more, among the liberal middle classes, identity politics appears to have rehabilitated a form of class hatred, with the white working-class forever the implied villain of the piece.

 

 

 

 9--It is the time for Britain to get moving again

 

We need to learn to live with the risks through a more balanced, pragmatic policy that takes account of our wider social and economic needs....Now is the time for bravery, for accepting that negative messaging will only make the crisis worse.

There were eight deaths reported on Thursday, the lowest number for that day of the week since lockdown began.

In the same vein, when the crisis was at its worst in April, more than 1,000 people died with the disease on 22 consecutive days. Yet the latest statistics, for the week ending July 24, recorded just 217 Covid deaths, accounting for just 2.4 per cent of all fatalities in England and Wales. We also know that the median age of those who died is over 80.

 

What makes the myopia about coronavirus all the more dangerous is that it leads to neglect of other, often serious, conditions, as the Mail reported this week.

Many cancer patients, for example, are finding tests, operations and treatment delayed, while mental health care, drug rehabilitation, care for the elderly and even getting an appointment with the GP are adversely impacted.

The pursuit of safety has become its own menace. On top of the economic damage, the Covid lockdown has brought a host of social problems, from fractured relationships to an increase in excessive drinking — in July alone, alcohol sales were up by 40 per cent.

Then there are the profound feelings of alienation and oppression, so different from the freedoms we took for granted until recently.

Our lives are governed by an endless barrage of complex, sometimes contradictory edicts. At my daughter’s school, she and her Year 6 classmates were bewildered and upset to be told they could not associate with any pupils outside their ‘bubble’.

At least she was able to go to school. By September, millions of pupils will have been deprived of any education for at least six months, even though there is no recorded case worldwide of any child passing on coronavirus in a school setting.

It is also clear that coronavirus has cemented inequalities between private schooling and the state sector, hindering social mobility.

But those Covid inequalities can be seen on every front — between rich and poor, male (who are at greater risk) and female, white and BAME (the latter group are far more likely to work in the front line of essential services and are significantly more vulnerable to the disease).

 

Most Britons are not at any risk of serious illness at all. The mortality rate is believed to be less than 0.5 per cent and much lower for those under 70 and those without underlying health issues.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Saturday, August 8, 2020

Today's Links

 The Inconvenient Truth--According to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control:

“There are no historical observations or scientific studies that support the confinement by quarantine of groups of possibly infected people for extended periods in order to slow the spread. It is hard to imagine that measures like those within the category of social distancing would not have some positive impact by reducing transmission of a human respiratory infection . . . However, the evidence base supporting each individual measure is often weak.” 

 

Experience has shown that communities faced with epidemics or other adverse events respond best and with the least anxiety when the normal social functioning of the community is least disrupted." Alex Berenson



Really?? Pelosi and Schumer only interested in Bailout Money for poorly run Democrat cities and states. Nothing to do with China Virus! Want one trillion dollars. No interest. We are going a different way! Trump

 

 

 1--Lockdown, school, BLM

 

the Democrats say the science demands us to go back in the lockdown. Now, since you've literally written the book on this. What are they missing?

ALEX BERENSON, "UNREPORTED TRUTHS OF COVID" AUTHOR: First of all, what they're missing is that for 15 years, the W.H.O, the CDC experts on this thought that a lockdown would be a terrible idea. They also thought, by the way, that border closings and travel restrictions like that would be a bad idea. They really - the people who have really looked at this the hardest for the longest for a long time, all said the same thing, which is wash your hands, sneeze into your elbow. And there's only so much you can do about this. And trying to do too much is as likely to cause pain as it is to do any good.

OK, so fast forward to March. All of the sudden we all panic, and the media leads that panic and the other outlets lead that panic. And suddenly in a matter of days, we throw out 15 years of advice. And that was what was so stunning to me in writing this booklet that was seeing how strong the advice really was and how consistent it really was. So, we throw out all this advice and guess what? Now we're five months later and it's fascinating. Sweden, which didn't lock down at all, appears to be done with its pandemic.

We'll see. But right now, it looks like they are through it. In the Sunbelt states, the last six weeks, there has been a spike in positive tests. There has been some spike in hospitalizations, but the deaths are much lower than they were in the northeast in March and April. So, which lockdown really hard, really fast. So, if you look on either a country level or a state level, where is the support for lockdowns? And that is what people warned us about. That's what's so fascinating about this. We were told what would happen....

 

PHIL KERPEN, COMMITTEE TO UNLEASH PROSPERITY: The CDC says that the risk of a school age child dying from COVID is about one in one million, five to ten times less than the risk of dying from flu. The pediatric infection rates are also low, but when they do get infected, it's very unlikely to cause any kind of serious illness. The head of the CDC used the term. It has very limited pathogenicity. He said, for anyone under age 45, unless they have other serious pre-existing conditions.

So, this is not a situation in which children are in any danger, but children are being scapegoated. They're being punished. They're being denied social interaction. And we've unfortunately now seen a very steep rise in pediatric suicide and drug overdose that the CDC says dwarfs the number of pediatric COVID deaths we've seen. So, that is a reckless thing to say. It is a damaging thing to say. And it's something that unfortunately results in the deaths of children as we're seeing school systems all over this country extend their closures out into the fall.

...INGRAHAM: Kathryn, what I found interesting today is this new Gallup poll that found that 81 percent of black Americans want police to spend the same amount of time or more in their area. So this whole thing is about black lives, then why are we voting among county supervisors, and then other Democrats ignoring this, because you're not going to have more police spending more time in these troubled areas if you are cutting $400 million. That's just not going to happen.

 

2--Hire more cops, but weed out the bad ones

 

. Each additional police officer hired from the Recovery Act prevented four violent crimes and 15 property crimes, on average. When dollar amounts are assigned to these crime reductions and compared with the salary and benefit costs of hiring new police officers, hiring more police is well worth the expense. A study by our Penn colleague Aaron Chalfin and Columbia professor Justin McCrary estimated the return to a dollar of spending on police at more than $1.50, leading them to conclude that most cities in the U.S. are actually under-policed—on the economic premise that any public benefit that generates more value than it costs is under-provisioned and could stand at least incremental expansion.

Just because police are worth hiring in order to reduce crime doesn’t negate the need for institutional reforms. Recent work shows that about 3 percent of police officers in Florida had previously been fired by other police agencies in the state. Less than 5 percent of Chicago cops account for most the city’s police misconduct cases and civilian complaints.

The current system does little to weed out bad cops, even when it’s easy to identify who they are. Making it easier to fire corrupt, violent, or negligent officers and ensuring that they don’t get reassigned to other police jobs should be the first order of business in any restructuring of police forces in the United States.

 

3--Reopen the Schools

 

There is no reason to cancel school, however. Health experts suggest delaying school reopenings in hard-hit areas until the virus is under control—with luck, by early fall. They encourage states with low infection rates to open on time. So far there is no correlation between school openings and infection levels. Despite high infection rates, Florida plans to reopen public schools in the next few weeks, while New York City, which now has among the lowest rates in the country, will apparently proceed with its plan for children to attend school perhaps only one day a week—though much uncertainty remains. Chicago schools, meantime, won’t open until November, at least.

The American Academy of Pediatrics has stressed that reopening is critical for children’s emotional and educational development. There is also an overwhelming economic case to be made in favor of reopening. In fact, the cost of not reopening schools will last a generation. The benefits of universal education are so deep and well-documented that it’s unthinkable to consider discounting it for another semester. Education is the most effective means of economic mobility and is critical for long-term success. It explains much of America’s income growth and development in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Today, moreover, schools provide important child-care services. As Goldman Sachs found, if schools don’t open, an estimated 15 percent of America’s labor force can’t return to work.

 

The negative effects of closed schools will be profound and generational. Economists reviewed the loss of earnings from school disruptions during World War II in Austria and Germany. They found that missing a year of school means 9.4 percent to 16.2 percent lower earnings for up to 40 years, with bigger losses for children with less educated parents. More recent estimates from 139 countries indicate a year of schooling increases earnings by 9 percent. Even brief school closures, such as the 1916 polio pandemic, lowered levels of educational attainment.

The costs won’t be suffered uniformly. Online schooling is better than no school, but it’s hardly an improvement for many students. As in wartime Germany and Austria, better-educated parents can make up the difference by helping their children with online education and adding more homeschooling. Some parents will hire tutors, create learning pods, move to communities that offer in-person education, or find private schools that reopen. Children from low-income households, however, will pay the biggest cost. Indeed, the impact on low-income families will last for years, creating a level of inequality so large that even Bernie Sanders-style levels of taxation won’t fix it. And yet progressives, who normally obsess over inequality, respond by asking affluent parents to forgo educating their children, in an act of class solidarity.

 

Prolonged school closures will also strain communities and undermine cities. Public schools, which remain the foundation of a healthy economy and society, bring children of different socioeconomic backgrounds together. Time away from these schools is associated with more crime and drug use. The longer the pandemic continues, the harder it will be to open schools, especially as students become unaccustomed to classroom discipline. It could take years to reacclimate children to school attendance. In recent decades, decent schools and safety were reasons why many upper- and middle-class families stayed in cities. Their presence served as a significant part of the modern urban renaissance. In their absence, cities revert to retaining the very rich, the very poor, and a handful of childless twentysomethings—in other words, communities with limited interaction.

If cities like New York fail to offer decent in-person schooling options for the next year, many middle- and upper-middle-class families will go elsewhere—and once they enroll their children in suburban schools, it’s unlikely they’ll return.

 

4--Abolish the Police? Those Who Survived the Chaos in Seattle Aren’t So Sure

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/08/07/us/defund-police-seattle-protests.html

What is it like when a city abandons a neighborhood and the police vanish? Business owners describe a harrowing experience of calling for help and being left all alone.

 

5--There’s no medical reason for keeping schools shut. In fact, it is causing much more harm to children than Covid-19 ever could 

 

6--Lockdowns Kill--UK lockdown restrictions “killed two people for every three” whose death was caused by COVID-19

UK lockdown restrictions “killed two people for every three” whose death was caused by COVID-19 by May 1, the Telegraph reported citing figures provided by the government's Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE).

According to estimates, by the start of May, 16,000 people had died in the UK due to missed medical treatment, including 6,000 who did not seek help at A&E services due to fears of catching the virus. The report noted that its “Stay Home, Protect the NHS, Save Lives” message prompted patients to avoid attending emergency rooms. During the same period, 25,000 people died as a direct consequence of contracting COVID-19.

The figures, calculated by the Department of Health, the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the government Actuary's Department and the Home Office, also showed that 10,000 more people died in care homes after they were discharged from hospitals during the virus’ peak.

 

7--Beirut Explosion Lays Groundwork for Regime Change Push 

 

8--Alex Berenson--Lockdown

 

In March, as the Sars-Cov-2 epidemic jumped to Europe and the United States, epidemiologists and public health experts told governments to lock down – fast and hard. Not just mass gatherings, but schools, offices, malls, even parks and beaches. To do anything less would be to sentence millions of people to death, the experts said.

Most infamously, the Imperial College London report of March 16 – written by researchers who were working with the World Health Organization – predicted more than 2 million American coronavirus deaths without immediate action. It called for a policy of what Professor Neil Ferguson, the report’s lead author, termed “suppression”...

 

mong the most vocal critics of lockdowns was Dr. Donald Henderson, who led the successful effort to eradicate smallpox. In December 2006, Henderson and three others wrote an 11-page paper called “Disease Mitigation Measures in the Control of Pandemic Influenza.” After outlining potential lockdown measures, they wrote, “We must ask whether any or all of the proposed measures are epidemiologically sound… [and] consider possible secondary social and economic impacts.”

(https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/bsp.2006.4.366?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub++0pubmed&)

Efforts in past epidemics to slow – much less stop – the spread of the flu had largely failed, the authors wrote. They attacked quarantines, travel bans, and school closings of more than two weeks as likely counterproductive. They did not even mention full lockdowns, presumably because they viewed those as so unlikely. And near the end of the paper, they made a heartfelt plea:

Experience has shown that communities faced with epidemics or other adverse events respond best and with the least anxiety when the normal social functioning of the community is least disrupted.

 

9--Sweden got it right

 

You know who isn’t worried about a second wave? Sweden. Covid cases may be rising worldwide but, in that stolid, sensible monarchy, they are down nearly 90 per cent from peak. “I think to a great extent it’s been a success,” says Anders Tegnell, the country’s chief epidemiologist. “We are now seeing rapidly falling cases, we have continuously had healthcare that has been working, there have been free beds at any given time, never any crowding in the hospitals, we have been able to keep schools open which we think is extremely important, and society fairly open.”..

 

To condemn Sweden for its relatively high number of deaths per capita suggests a worrying inability, even after five months, to grasp what “flattening the curve” means. In the absence of a cure or vaccine, an epidemic will end up reaching roughly the same number of people. That number may differ from country to country for all sorts of possible reasons: age profile, weather, family living patterns, openness to international travel, incidence of obesity, past exposure to different coronaviruses, differing levels of genetic immunity.

But it won’t be much affected by lockdown measures. To put it at its simplest, flattening the curve doesn’t alter the area underneath the curve. No country can immobilise its population indefinitely; so all we are doing, in the absence of a medical breakthrough, is buying time.

 

Confining an entire population is bound to have some impact on slowing a disease – any disease. The question is how high a price we should be prepared to pay.

Sweden seems to have got it right. It banned large meetings and urged people to stay home where possible. But, beyond one or two targeted closures, it broadly trusted people to use their nous. Because it judged coolly at the outset that there would be no immediate vaccine, it never got into the ridiculous position of being unable to restore normality in the absence of one. It settled in for the long haul, understanding that the disease would be around for a while, and that acquired immunity would be part of the eventual solution.

 

10--To save lives, and save the economy, we need another lockdown.(today's bedwetter essay)

Dr. Osterholm is director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota. Mr. Kashkari is president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.

 

In just weeks we could almost stop the viral fire that has swept across this country over the past six months and continues to rage out of control. It will require sacrifice but save many thousands of lives.

We believe the choice is clear. We can continue to allow the coronavirus to spread rapidly throughout the country or we can commit to a more restrictive lockdown, state by state, for up to six weeks to crush the spread of the virus to less than one new case per 100,000 people per day.

That’s the point at which we will be able to limit the increase in new cases through aggressive public health measures, just as other countries have done. But we’re a long way from there right now.

The imperative for this is clear because as a nation what we have done so far hasn’t worked. Some 160,000 people have died, and in recent days, roughly a thousand have died a day. An estimated 30 million Americans are collecting unemployment.

 

Why did the United States’ Covid-19 containment response fail, particularly compared with the successful results of so many nations in Asia, Europe and even our neighbor Canada?

Simply, we gave up on our lockdown efforts to control virus transmission well before the virus was under control. Many other countries didn’t let up until the number of cases was greatly reduced, even in places that had extensive outbreaks in March and April. 

 

To successfully drive down our case rate to less than one per 100,000 people per day, we should mandate sheltering in place for everyone but the truly essential workers. By that, we mean people must stay at home and leave only for essential reasons: food shopping and visits to doctors and pharmacies while wearing masks and washing hands frequently

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday, August 7, 2020

Today's Links

1--There’s no medical reason for keeping schools shut. In fact, it is causing much more harm to children than Covid-19 ever could

 

There are, last time I looked, around five hundred thousand teachers in England and Wales. Which means that if we opened the schools, and the pandemic took off again, we may expect around eight teachers to die of Covid-19, and around the same number of children.

That is the absolute maximum number. This assumes that they all contract the infection, entirely from being at school, and from nowhere else, and that there is no immunity to the disease, in anyone. Of course, there are older and more vulnerable teachers, but they can be protected if needs be.

Maybe you think that this figure is still too high. What we should be aiming for is no deaths at all. In that case you really should never let children walk near roads, swim, cycle or be driven in cars. In fact, you should never let them out of the house, because homicide, by strangers, is a far higher probability than this..

 

On average, around one child per week is killed from abuse, or neglect, in the home. This is four times the number of Covid-19 deaths, and lockdown is likely to make this figure far worse. It has already been found that domestic abuse deaths have risen sharply since lockdown. If deaths from domestic abuse are rising, it is sadly inevitable that more children are going to be physically and sexually abused at home, as made clear in this article from ‘Medpage’ in the US. ‘Kids During Lockdown: Is Another Epidemic About to Be Revealed?’.

“Sadly, we know from previous disasters that during these times of intense emotional and economic stress, rates of child abuse and neglect increase. Injuries and deaths among infants due to abusive head trauma increase during times of economic stress, and scattered reports among physicians at children's hospitals in various states are reporting that is happening now, too.”

I do not think it is a stretch to say that lockdown could well cause more injuries and deaths to children than Covid-19 ever could. 

 

...messages about Covid-19 have been doom-laden shroud waving. In April, I wrote this:

“Covid-19 is being presented as a deadly killer that does not discriminate. Young, old, we are all at risk of contracting this dreadful disease. Every night, the television news has story after story of young people who have been infected, and who have died. In fact, very, very few people under 20 have died so far. I believe it was five, at the end of last week.’

Many parents and teachers have been, simply, terrified by the endless bombardment of frightening tales, and images. The reality is that children are not at risk, most teachers are not at risk. Not compared to normal pre-Covid life. Driving, going on planes, climbing hills, swimming, house fires, electric shocks, inhalation and ingestion of food – that latter one kills over two hundred a year. Accidental poisoning, fifteen hundred year.

Life cannot be risk free, it simply cannot. By pretending that it is, or could be, we are destroying the educational prospects of millions of children. We are terrifying them, and their teachers over something that carries a minute risk. Has the world ever been more frightened of something less frightening?

The fear must be fought, the schools need to open. Life is for living.

 

2--Kids and school, Some say "No"

 

The CDC reports that between February 1 and June 17 there were 13 deaths of children between the ages of 5 and 14. By July 15, there were 342 cases across the US of pediatric multi-system inflammatory syndrome, including six deaths. On Tuesday, it was reported that two teenagers in Florida succumbed to the virus, bringing the total number of minors killed by COVID-19 in the state to seven....

 

Particularly pernicious is the CDC’s false comparison between the effects on children of COVID-19, the flu, and H1N1. It states that while COVID-19 has been responsible for 64 deaths, this is less than each of the last five flu seasons as well as the 358 pediatric deaths from H1N1 over an 18-month period. The implication is that the public should adopt the perspective of “herd immunity” and accept a “reasonable” amount of death akin to that produced by regular seasonal ailments.

 

3--Yes, Kids Can Get Covid. But They’re More Likely to Die of Flu

 

“Nobody said children don’t get COVID-19 so not sure what the breaking news is. A 12 year-old child has a 1 in 55,000 chance of dying IF they get it. That same child is 25x more likely to die from other causes. As a society, we have lost all commonsense in terms of risk assessment.”

The negligible risk to children is also mentioned in this piece in today’s Telegraph by Science Editor Sarah Knapton entitled “How the danger of coronavirus compares with the risks of everyday life”. She writes:

Children have a greater chance of being hit by lightning than dying from coronavirus with the death rate for five to 14-year-olds in England and Wales currently just one in 3.5 million. For under-fives, it is one in 1.17 million.

. The Telegraph has more.

Although there are fears that releasing measures too soon has led to localised spikes in some areas, new data suggests that there was no overall rise after primary schools returned and non-essential shops reopened.

According to Imperial College London and Ipsos Mori, community prevalence actually fell after lockdown measures were relaxed, decreasing from 12 infections per 10,000 people in May to eight in 10,000 by mid-June to early July.

 

 4-- Tucker: America was a very different country 7 months ago

 

5--Prolonged closures are their own crisis--The progressive experiment will destroy the future for millions of kids

 

Children from low-income households, however, will pay the biggest cost. Indeed, the impact on low-income families will last for years, creating a level of inequality so large that even Bernie Sanders-style levels of taxation won’t fix it. And yet progressives, who normally obsess over inequality, respond by asking affluent parents to forgo educating their children, in an act of class solidarity.

Prolonged school closures will also strain communities and undermine cities. Public schools, which remain the foundation of a healthy economy and society, bring children of different socioeconomic backgrounds together. Time away from these schools is associated with more crime and drug use. The longer the pandemic continues, the harder it will be to open schools, especially as students become unaccustomed to classroom discipline. It could take years to reacclimate children to school attendance. In recent decades, decent schools and safety were reasons why many upper- and middle-class families stayed in cities. Their presence served as a significant part of the modern urban renaissance. In their absence, cities revert to retaining the very rich, the very poor, and a handful of childless twentysomethings—in other words, communities with limited interaction.

If cities like New York fail to offer decent in-person schooling options for the next year, many middle- and upper-middle-class families will go elsewhere—and once they enroll their children in suburban schools, it’s unlikely they’ll return...

 

There is no reason to cancel school, however. Health experts suggest delaying school reopenings in hard-hit areas until the virus is under control—with luck, by early fall. They encourage states with low infection rates to open on time. So far there is no correlation between school openings and infection levels. Despite high infection rates, Florida plans to reopen public schools in the next few weeks, while New York City, which now has among the lowest rates in the country, will apparently proceed with its plan for children to attend school perhaps only one day a week—though much uncertainty remains. Chicago schools, meantime, won’t open until November, at least.

The American Academy of Pediatrics has stressed that reopening is critical for children’s emotional and educational development. There is also an overwhelming economic case to be made in favor of reopening. In fact, the cost of not reopening schools will last a generation. The benefits of universal education are so deep and well-documented that it’s unthinkable to consider discounting it for another semester. Education is the most effective means of economic mobility and is critical for long-term success. It explains much of America’s income growth and development in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Today, moreover, schools provide important child-care services. As Goldman Sachs found, if schools don’t open, an estimated 15 percent of America’s labor force can’t return to work.

 

The negative effects of closed schools will be profound and generational. Economists reviewed the loss of earnings from school disruptions during World War II in Austria and Germany. They found that missing a year of school means 9.4 percent to 16.2 percent lower earnings for up to 40 years, with bigger losses for children with less educated parents. More recent estimates from 139 countries indicate a year of schooling increases earnings by 9 percent. Even brief school closures, such as the 1916 polio pandemic, lowered levels of educational attainment.

 

6-- Heather Mac Donald...Hmmm?

 

what was controversial about my speech in the eyes of Silicon Valley's overlords is that I tried to present clear data, federal data, uncontestable facts that demolished the Black Lives Matter narrative that show that policing in this country is not in fact, systemically racist, that law abiding residents of high crime communities beg for more police protection. And that the narrative that law enforcement in this country is on some white supremacist crusade against minorities is not just wrong, but is extraordinarily dangerous because it has resulted in attacks on the very institutions of civilization, whether it's law enforcement officers themselves, or court houses or district attorney's offices, or indeed we're seeing now the founding fathers being torn down that really I think is putting us in a very dangerous position as a country, a danger that really cannot be understated.

Seth Barron: Well hold on, let's back up just a moment. You said that there's data that debunks basically the Black Live Matter narrative that there's disproportionate police violence directed against black people. But I mean, clearly we hear all the time about black people being murdered by police. So how can you say that there's some kind of contradictory evidence?

Heather Mac Donald: I can say it Seth based three types of evidence: the raw numbers about police shootings, the individual cases purporting to make that claim, and a large body of criminological research. The main flaw in what the public is fed all the time, well I would say one of two, as far as the raw numbers go, we hear about the raw numbers of police shootings, and they're measured against a population benchmark rather than a crime benchmark. So listeners may have often heard that blacks are two and a half times more likely to be fatally shot by a police officer. Every year, the police shoot nationwide about a thousand civilians, almost all of them armed and dangerous. Whites make up about 50% of those fatal police shooting victims. So around 500 whites are killed each year and blacks make up around 25%, so around 250 blacks are killed each year.

 

So if you look at those numbers and you're a Black Lives Matter activist, or you're an academic, or you're a democratic politician, you say, "Well, blacks are 13% of the population, they make up 25% of all fatal victims of police shootings, therefore, the police must be racist." But that is absolutely the wrong benchmark because the police determine tactics, they determine deployment, based on where people are most being victimized, and that sadly is in minority communities. Blacks die of homicide between the ages of 10 and 43 at 13 times the rate of whites of the same ages. The Black Lives Matter movement never talks about that, doesn't give a damn, but the reason that blacks die of homicide at that much, much higher rate is because they commit homicide, drive-by shootings, at an equally disproportionate rate. And so that's what you have to look at, where are police officers more likely to encounter armed violent resisting suspects, and that is in minority communities because that's where crime is happening.

 implicit bias or microaggressions are what one generates when you can't find actual examples of overt racism or explicit racism??

it's a lot easier to believe the former where you have actual evidence for it. The other is based on a sort of a miasma, some kind of invisible effusion throughout our world that we're supposed to believe is holding people back. And the other thing I would argue, Seth, is on average, I'm talking about averages here, I'm not talking about individuals, cultural differences, choices that people make that have an effect on life outcomes. So whatever your race, if you have children out of wedlock, you're four to five times more likely to be poor, that's a behavioral difference. Those are much more important in determining group outcomes then the implicit bias. I've argued that we should have a thought experiment. If blacks adopted the behaviors of Asians for 10 years in all things related to success, with the low crime rates, and we still saw racial disparities in prison, we still saw economic gaps, then I'm going to be willing to look for the miasmas of implicit bias and white fragility and white privilege and microaggressions. But right now the overt and obvious behavioral differences are too great to be much persuaded by micro-aggression type analysis.

 

Now we seem to be seeing a rapid reversal in the direction of crime in New York City. Shootings in particular are way up. The number of shootings so far this year has already surpassed last year's total. Why is this happening?

Heather Mac Donald: It's happening because of the Black Lives Matter narrative, cops are backing off. The level of hostility that's directed at them now when they try to make an arrest is absolutely horrifying. The cops are the symbol of law and order. They are the symbol of civilization. And when people feel like they can attack them with impunity, they're acting not just out of a reactive hatred, they are deliberately trying to bring us to a condition of anarchy. And cops have been told that they are racist for engaging in the type of proactive policing that protects people, whether it's stop, question, and frisk, whether it's enforcing low level quality of life laws, the disorder on the streets out of which drive-by shootings emerge. You have a district attorney in Manhattan now who has announced that he's not going to enforce the laws against turnstile jumping in the subways.

You have a mayor who said he's no longer going to a business owners in cleaning up gang graffiti on their businesses. We are unlearning the lessons of the 1990s at an astounding rate, and it shows that those lessons were never widely understood. I think people at the Manhattan Institute and moderates in New York who think it's so obvious that policing and respect for public order was essential to the economic Renaissance that New York began experiencing in the '90s. That seems so obvious, but we didn't realize that there's people like Mayor Bill de Blasio and the growing cadre of evermore left wing city council members and public advocates, and you name it, that never bought into that

 

... the lowest crime rate in US history was during the Great Depression. The economic recession of 2008, crime dropped.