Thursday, April 7, 2016

Today's Links

1---Earnings and revenues continue to contract (Video)


Santelli: Fed will hold pat until after election, but if dollar continues to weaken, stocks should rise significantly


2--Perfectly stated! Excellent! The message of Wisconsin


The mass vote for a candidate claiming to be socialist discredits what has become a foundational narrative of American politics: that the United States is a country where the working class is unalterably hostile to any alternative to the “free enterprise” system. Not only socialism, but even liberalism has been virtually banned from official politics, referred to by cowering Democrats as the “L-word,” from which they seek to distance themselves.

Marxists have always insisted that “American exceptionalism” was of a historically limited and relative character. The slow political development of the American working class was bound up with the privileged position of American capitalism, which made possible steadily rising living standards for the working class and thus encouraged illusions in the viability of the profit system.


The change in the objective situation is beginning to produce a corresponding change in consciousness. It is of enormous significance that Sanders has won his greatest support among working class voters under the age of 45. This generation is being politically radicalized by the protracted decay of American capitalism--its decline on the world market and the resulting devastating impact on the jobs and living standards of American workers.

It required social processes maturing over many years to create the conditions where a somewhat anomalous figure, a little-known senator from a tiny state, could disrupt the planned coronation of the Democratic presidential frontrunner...


Sanders is riding a wave of economic anger and hostility over social inequality. Despite all efforts to cover it up, it has proven impossible to conceal the deeply rooted sickness of American society: the ever-widening economic gulf between the top one percent (or one-tenth of one percent) and the broad masses who work for a living and produce the wealth...

The Democratic Party cannot be an instrument for combating the social crisis. Like the Republicans, it is unalterably committed to the defense of the profit system and shares responsibility for the bipartisan assault on the working class. The Democrats have moved steadily to the right over the past four decades, abandoning whatever remained of the reformist policies of New Deal liberalism and the social-welfare programs of the 1960s.


3--Time to stop dancing with equities on a live volcano

4--Shocking Statistic: Over 40% Of Student Borrowers Don't Make Payments

5--Can't get no satisfaction: Gallup: 71% dissatisfied with "the way things are going in the US

6--Who's buying equities? Nobody except stock buybacks



7--The Obama Jobs-Surge! "Ya want fries with that, M'am?"


 

 8--Is the American dream dead?

9--The people have spoken: "Things are getting worse not better"


In a new survey by the Pew Research Council, half of the registered voters surveyed (51%) said they think the future for the next generation will be worse, while just 24% said life will be better for the next generation. The survey indicated this pessimistic sentiment is spread across racial and economic lines.


When the Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll asked Americans in December whether the nation’s economy would get better or worse over the next year, just 24% said it would get better, while three quarters said it would either get worse (24%) or stay the same (50%). In the fall of 2012, the share seeing economic improvement coming was at 45%.

10--Campaign Exposes Fissures Over Issues, Values and How Life Has Changed in the U.S


Among GOP voters, fully 75% of those who support Donald Trump for the Republican presidential nomination say life for people like them has gotten worse...Currently, 22% of registered voters say they are “angry” at the federal government, while 59% are “frustrated” and 17% “basically content.....



GOP voters who support Trump also stand out for their pessimism about the nation’s economy and their own financial situations: 48% rate current economic conditions in the U.S. as “poor” – no more than about a third of any other candidate’s supporters say the same. And 50% of Trump supporters are not satisfied with their financial situations, the highest among any candidate’s supporteWithin the GOP, anger at government is heavily concentrated among Trump supporters – 50% say they are angry at government, compared with 30% of Cruz backers and just 18% of those who support Kasich.  ...



Among those who support Trump for the GOP nomination, 69% say immigrants are a burden, Overall, 57% of all registered voters say that immigrants in the United States today strengthen the country because of their hard work and talents, while 35% say they are a burden because they take jobs, housing and health care. Republican and Republican-leaning voters are more than three times more likely than Democrats and Democratic leaners to view immigrants as a burden (56% vs. 17%)...


Among Republicans, a majority of those who back Trump (61%) view the system as unfair...among Trump supporters, just 27% say trade agreements are beneficial for the U.S, while 67% say they are bad thing. ...


 Not all issues are so divisive. Among all voters, 71% say that, when thinking about the future of Social Security, benefits should not be reduced (26% say reductions need to be considered). Among supporters of the presidential candidates, majorities ranging from 62% to 73% say Social Security benefits should not be reduced.     Far more Cruz supporters (73%) than Trump (53%) or Kasich (50%) supporters say abortion should be illegal in most or all cases.  Only about a quarter of Clinton supporters (24%) and 21% of Sanders supporters favor making abortion illegal in at least most cases.


85% of registered voters say they have given “quite a lot” of thought to the election ...

 75% of voters say news organizations have given too much coverage to Trump


As was seen in a major report on attitudes about government released last fall, voters continue to be more frustrated than angry with government. Frustration – rather than anger – is the dominant emotion in voters’ views of politics as well...


Fully 85% of registered voters say they have given a lot of thought to the 2016 election. That is not only greater interest than at comparable points in recent campaigns, it is the highest level of interest measured at any point in all elections since 1988...



As the primary campaigns continue, overall feelings toward the federal government have remained steady. About six-in-ten registered voters (59%) say they feel frustrated with the federal government, while 22% say they are angry and just 17% say they are basically content. ...


Overall, 35% of Republican voters say they are angry at government; more (58%) describe themselves as frustrated and just 6% say they are basically content with the federal government....



Half of Trump supporters (50%) say they are angry at the federal government, compared with 30% of Cruz supporters and 18% of Kasich supporters. Even smaller shares of Sanders (13%) and Clinton supporters (6%) express anger at governmentAnger at government – and politics – is much more pronounced among Trump backers than among supporters of any other presidential candidate, Republican or Democrat....


Most voters continue to say that Muslims living in the U.S. should not be subject to additional security scrutiny solely because of their religion (61%), while 33% say that they should be subject to more scrutiny than people in other religious groups. Views are unchanged from December of last year.


On the issue of abortion, there continue to be deep divisions along partisan lines. About three-quarters (74%) of Democratic voters say abortion should be legal in all or most cases, while 23% say it should be illegal in all or most cases. By contrast, 58% of Republican voters say abortion should be illegal in all or most cases; 39% think it should be legal in all or most case...


On the Republican side, supporters of Donald Trump stand out for their unfavorable views of free trade, negative assessments of national economic conditions and their own personal finances, and for being more likely than supporters of other GOP candidates to say the economic system in this country unfairly favors powerful interests....



While many questions regarding government benefits elicit opposing views among Republicans and Democrats, there is broad consensus on preserving Social Security benefits. Clear majorities of Republican and Democratic registered voters — and backers of all five presidential candidates — oppose reductions to the Social Security benefits of future retireesWhen asked about the long-term future of Social Security, about seven-in-ten registered voters (71%) say that benefits should not be reduced in any way, while only about a quarter (26%) says some reductions in benefits for future retirees need to be considered.




19% of Americans 55–64 have no retirement savings or pension. (Federal Reserve)
63% of people believe their children will be worse off than they are. (CNN)


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